Lot 2, 110&112 and 114 E. Main St. deed abstracts (incomplete)                         (5-8-06)

 

Incomplete.  Compiled and updated by Brad Toole 24jan06

 

Lot 2 spans the modern properties of two houses on East Main Street east of the Town Square, the painted brick house at 110&112 and the stone house at 114 E. Main.  In the later deed abstracts below, these address numbers are given in square brackets at the beginning of the description of the property.  They are not given in the deeds themselves.  They were first assigned a few years after WWII.

 

Lot 2 was owned intact only until 1766, when it was divided lengthwise.  The two halves were reunited in 1781 and sold as one lot in 1784, but in 1788 they were separated for good.  By 1788 there was an alley between the two halves, defining the present parcels.  This alley provided another public access route to the head of the spring, but there is also an alley to the spring on the west margin of this lot.  Why another alley?

 

One or both halves probably had a substantial house by 1781, based on the sale prices, but the deeds are odd and don’t reliably tell us more than that.  The lots also seemed to lose most of their value in 1784, which could be for various reasons.  The earliest clear reference to a house was in 1788, the stone house on the east half where David Harvey lived, which still stands.

 

David Harvey was an Ordinary Keeper when he sold the stone house in 1799 for 800 pounds.  It was called William Rohrback’s house in 1823, and the Tavern of William Rohrback in 1824.  (This is written in deeds for Lot 3.)  The west half apparently had the existing brick house by then.

 

It is possible that the existing stone and brick houses date to sometime between 1766 and 1781, but more documentation will have to be found to confirm it.

 

Where two dates are given, the first is the date that the deed was made and actually signed, and the date in parentheses is the date it was copied and recorded at the courthouse.  Buyers and sellers in the later deeds are from Washington County unless otherwise noted.  Name spellings varied as written in each deed abstract.

 

[Items in square brackets are comments or clarifications.] 

 

Joseph McGrew bought from Joseph Chapline

         16 June 1764 (recorded 22 June, Frederick Co. Liber J, folio 650-2)

         for 1 shilling

Lot 2, 103 x 206ft, to pay rent of 3s 6p yearly. [from Patricia Abelard Andersen’s deed abstracts]

 

Andrew Neisinger bought from Joseph McGrew

         8 March 1766 (recorded 13 March, Frederick Co. Liber K, folio 410-1)

         for 35

[114]  East half of Lot 2, 51.5 x 206ft, to pay rent of 1s 9p sterling yearly.  Isabella Magrue, wife of Joseph Magrue released dower.”  [from Patricia Abelard Andersen’s deed abstracts]

 

Matthias Spangler bought from Joseph McGrew

         8 March 1766 (recorded 27 March, Liber K, Frederick Co. folio 439-40)

         for 34

[110&112]  West half of Lot 2, 51.5 x one length.  Isabella McGrew released her Dower rights.  Paying 1/2 penny alienation fine to John Darnall.  [from Patricia Abelard Andersen’s deed abstracts]

 

[Missing a deed or two, where Andrew Neisinger sells the east half and where Matthias Spangler buys it.  Neither of these found in Washington Co., so may be in Frederick Co. Land Records.]

 

Matthew Whiting bought from Matthias Spangler

         19 February 1781 (recorded 28 March, Washington Co. Liber B, folio 454-5)

         for 1300

[114]  Easternmost part [half] of Lot 2, 51.5 x 206ft, with profits, advantages and appurtenances, to pay rent of 1s 9p Sterling money of Great Britain on July 9, 1781 [“yearly” not mentioned].  Wife Julianah Spangler released her right of dower.  Before J.P.’s Joseph Chapline and Christopher Chruss.  [A high-priced lot, but see the note under the deed below.]

 

Matthew Whiting bought from Matthias Spangler

         19 February 1781 (recorded 28 March, Washington Co. Liber B, folio 455-7)

         for 1300

[110&112]  Westernmost part [half] of Lot 2, 51.5 x 206ft, with profits, advantages and appurtenances, to pay rent of 1s 9p Sterling money of Great Britain yearly on July 9.  Wife Julianah Spangler released her right of dower.  Before J.P.’s Joseph Chapline and Christopher Chruss.

 

[Another high-priced sale, but following these two deeds in the Liber was a third (folio 457-8) for Out Lot 61, 20 x 40 perches, on which no more than a barn or stable was allowed to be built, which was also sold for 1300.  The deeds are written as separate, stand-alone documents, with no reference to each other.  Ordinarily, 1300 on 1781 deeds would indicate a big house or building on each lot, but an out lot would never sell for such a high price by itself, unless there was some peculiar reason between Matthew and Matthias, or there was a big stone barn on it.  But the coincidence of the three deeds being for exactly the same, high, price is too much.  I suspect that Matthew bought all three for one payment of 1300, and for some reason they put that one payment on each of these three deeds.  This seems to be a unique case.]

 

John Stone bought from Matthew Whiting

         15 June 1784 (recorded 4 November, Liber D, folio 112-4)

         for 105

Lot 2, 103 x 206ft, with profits, advantages and appurtenances, to pay rent of 3s 6p yearly on July 9th and any rents that may grow due to the lord proprietary.  Wife Elizabeth Whiting released dower.  Before J.P.’s Joseph Chapline and Rich Davis.

 

[Note the big drop in price, from 1300 pounds!  Had there been two houses that burned down, or was John a relative of Matthew’s and getting a discount, or was he buying it for a low price to settle a debt from Matthew?  But in the next deed one half sells with a stone house for only 50 pounds.  Maybe some old tax records would tell us.]

 

David Harvey bought from John Stone

         8 February 1788 (recorded 11 February, Liber E, folio 739-41)

         for 50

[114]  [East part of] Lot 2, 48’3” x 206’, whereon David now lives, with profits, advantages and appurtenances, to pay rent of 1s 9p yearly on July 9th and any rents.  John also makes over all his rights in a 10’x206’ alley from the main Street to the head of the spring, beginning at the corner of David Harveys Stone house, and running as now laid out through the middle of the lot.  This is to remain as a publick alley forever without any hindrance or molestation whatsoever from either parties holding and possessing the other parts of said Lott, the alley being part of the consideration for the 50 pounds.

 

Elizabeth Stone released dower before J.P.’s Joseph Chapline and Alexr. Clagett.

 

[This was the east part based on the deed chain back from 1813.  Strictly, this deed doesn’t exactly say that the stone house was on this parcel, but the facts of David’s living here, and having a stone house that defines an alley here indicates that the stone house was on this parcel, and not on the other side of the alley.  There is a stone house here now.  David did not own any other property next to Lot 2 until 1799, when he bought the east half of Lot 1.]

 

Benjamin Tyson bought from John Stone

         12 March 1792 (recorded 27 April, Liber G, folio 685)

         for ₤125

[110&112]  Remaining part [about half, west side] of Lot 2, to pay rent of 1s 9p sterling yearly.  The rest of the lot, on the other side of the alley running through Lot 2, had been sold to David Harvey.  Wife Elizabeth Stone released dower.

 

John Berg, Farmer bought from David Harvey, Ordinary Keeper

         29 August 1799 (recorded 13 September, Liber M, folio 150-2)

         for ₤800

[114]  One equal Moiety [east half] of Lot 2, Fronting on the main Street for the full front of said Lott including one half of the alley next to Benjamin Tyson’s Lott 51½ feet, and extending back to the alley [206’], with Buildings, Improvements, advantages and appurtenances.  To pay ground rents to George Wotz, Joseph Chapline or his heirs.  Wife Mary Harvey released dower.  Before associate Justice George Scott, Senr. and witnessed by George Wotz.

 

William Rohrback bought from John Berg

         27 September 1813 (recorded 20 October, Liber Y, folio 941-2)

         for $1,650

[114]  Easternmost half of Lot 2, 51½ x 206 feet, with appurtenances.  To pay 2s 11p to Joseph Chapline or his heirs on July 9th yearly.  Wife Barbara Berg released dower.  J.P.’s Geo. Smith and John Blackford.

 

George Hedrick bought from George Smith, John Miller, Samuel D. Price, Christian Bealer and Jacob Miller, Commissioners, for Benjamin Tyson estate.

         3 January 1824 (recorded 26 March, Liber GG, folio 746-8)

         for $3,933

[110&112]  Lot 2 [west half], and Out Lots 16, 17,18, 33, 62 and 73.  The out lots are each 5 acres.  Lot 2 is subject to the Dower of Margaret Tyson, Widow of Benjamin, during her natural life.  To pay ground rents.  [A house was on this property, see below.  The size of the lots is not given.]

 

This resulted from the petition of George and his wife Margaret, who was daughter of Benjamin and Margaret.  In the March 1815 Term of the Court of Washington County, these Commissioners were assigned under the Act of Assembly of the State of Maryland entitled “an Act to direct descents” to set a valuation on Benjamin’s property and offer to sell it.  This they did in the March 1816 Term, Land Record Liber BB, folio 604-7.  An unnamed person was entitled to elect to take the same or any part thereof at this valuation, but declined, so they sold it all at Public Sale. 

 

George Hedrick was the highest bidder, and met the terms of paying half on the ratification date of the sale, and the balance in their [sic; three] annual payments with interest.  He took up bonds to do this, and paid them off, so this deed was made.  Before J.P.’s Benjamin F. Hickman and Daniel Donelly.

 

[The Commission and Release, recorded 27th March 1816, was at the petition of George Hedrick, for the evaluation of Benjamin Tyson’s estate and the determination if it could be divided among the heirs without losing value.  It couldn’t.  The estate comprised Town Lots 2, 16, 56, 57, 58 & 59, and out lots 16, 17, 18, 33, 62 & 73. 

 

[The Commissioners met on June 10, 1815, and stayed for 3 days.  They divided the estate in two halves which they evaluated each to be worth $1,700.  One half included Town Lot 2 with a house, and the front Celler belonging to said house, and the Store room and the room above the Store room were excepted.  This would be widow Margaret Tyson’s dower and would encumber that half of the estate.

 

[The heirs were Benjamin’s wife Margaret, daughter Margaret (George Hedrick’s wife), and the under age children of their deceased daughter Elizabeth Hamm: Benjamin T. Hamm, Margaret Hamm, Mary T. Hamm, and Elizabeth T. Hamm.]

 

[The preceding deed in this Liber (folio 745-6), for Lot 3, says that it adjoins the Tavern of William Rohrback.  With that and this chain we can see that this Tavern was on the east half of Lot 2, 114 E. Main St. now.  The west half apparently had a house with Margaret Tyson’s dower, since it was not called “Tavern.”]